In Praise of Vendor Lock-In

There is one really nice thing about having a blog whose readership consists mainly of car insurance spambots:  I don’t have to feel guilty when I don’t post anything for a while.  I had started a series on...

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TAC Tales #11: Full up

No customer is happy if they have to reboot one of their Internet-facing routers periodically, and this was one of our biggest customers.  (At HTTS, they were all big customers.)  This customer had a GSR connecting to the...

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TAC Tales #10: Out to Lunch

When you work at TAC, you are required to be “on-shift” for 4 hours each day.  This doesn’t mean that you work four hours a day, just that you are actively taking cases only four hours per day.  The other four...

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The value of a CCIE

In the final post in my “Ten Years a CCIE” series, I take a look at the age-old question: Is a CCIE really worth it? I conclude the series with some thoughts on the value of this journey. I’ve written this...

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Why certifications can suck

Ivan Peplnjak referenced a piece by Robert Graham called “Why cybersecurity certifications suck,” which I found amusing considering that I am doing some question writing right now.  I’ve certainly been a member...

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TAC Tales #9: Left Hanging

When I was still a new engineer, a fellow customer support engineer (CSE) asked a favor of me. I’ll call him Andy. “I’m going on PTO, could you cover a case for me? I’ve filed a bug and while I’m...

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TAC Tales #8: The problem with data

My job as a customer support engineer (CSE) at TAC was the most quantified I’ve ever had.  Every aspect of our job performance was tracked and measured.  We live in the era of big data, and while numbers can be helpful,...

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Cheaters

In this article in the “Ten Years a CCIE” series, I look at the question of cheating.  Is it possible to cheat on the CCIE exam?  And what does cheating do to the value of the certification? Yes, you can cheat on the...

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