Author: ccie14023

Memories of Cisco Live II – Berlin 2016

Getting a session at Cisco Live is not a given, even for a Principal TME.  I started at Cisco in October 2015, and I certainly didn’t expect to present at, or even go to, Cisco Live Berlin in January 2016.  Normally, there are three ways to secure a session at CL: Submit an idea during the “Call for papers” process about six months before a given event.  The Session Group Managers (SGMs) who manage individual tracks (e.g., security, data center) then must approve it.  It can be hard to get that approval.  SGMs need to have faith in your...

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Memories of Cisco Live

The last Cisco Live I attended was in Barcelona in January 2020.  As I was in the airport heading home, I was reading news of a new virus emerging from China.  I looked with bemusement at a troop of high-school-age girls who all had surgical masks on.  Various authorities told us not to wear masks, saying they don’t do much to prevent viral spread at a large scale.  The girls kept pulling the masks on and off.  I thought back on my performance at Cisco Live, and looked forward to Cisco Live in Las Vegas in the summer.  Who knew that, a few months hence, everyone would be wearing masks and Cisco Live,  physically, would be indefinitely postponed. For Technical Marketing Engineers (TMEs), Cisco Live (technically Cisco Live!) measures the seasons of our year like the crop cycle measures the seasons of a farmer’s year.  Four times annually a large portion of our team would hop on an airplane and depart for Europe, Cancun, Melbourne, or a US city.  Cancun and Melbourne were constant, but the European and US cities would change every couple of years.  In my time with Cisco, I have traveled to Cancun and Melbourne, Berlin, Barcelona, Las Vegas, Orlando, and San Diego to present and staff Cisco Live. A trade show may just be a corporate event, but for those of us who devoted our...

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How not to do Internet Connectivity

My first IT job was at a small company in Novato, California, that designed and built museum exhibits.  At the time most companies either designed the exhibits or built them, but ours was the only one that did both.  You could separate the services, and just do one or the other, but our end-to-end model was the best offering because the fabricators and designers were in the same building and could collaborate easily.  The odd thing about separating the functions was that we could lose a bid to design a project, but win the bid to build it, and hence end up having to work closely with a competitor to deliver their vision. The company was small–only 60 employees.  Half of them were fabricators who did not have computers, whereas the other half were designers and office staff who did.  My original job was to be a “gopher” (or go-fer), who goes for stuff.  If someone needed paint, screws, a nail gun, fumigation of a stuffed tiger, whatever, I’d get in the truck and take care of it.  However, they quickly realized I was skilled with computers and they asked me to take over as their IT guy.  (Note to newbies:  When this happens, especially at a small company, people often don’t forget you had the old job.  One day I might be fixing a computer, then the next...

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Netstalgia: Bad Timing

After I left TAC I worked for two years at a Gold Partner in San Francisco.  One of my first customers there was one of my most difficult, and it all came down to timing. I was dispatched to perform a network assessment of a small real-estate SaaS company in the SF East Bay.  Having just spent two years in TAC, I had no idea how to perform a network assessment, and unfortunately nobody at the partner was helping me.  I had been told they had a dedicated laptop loaded with tools just for this purpose, but nobody could locate it.  I started downloading tools on my own, but I couldn’t find a good, free network analysis tool.  Another engineer recommended a product called “The Dude” from MikroTik, and since it was easy to install I decided to use it.  I needed to leave it collecting data for a few days, and since nobody had provided me an assessment laptop I had to leave my own computer there.  I distinctly remember the client asking me what tool I was using to collect data, and sheepishly answering “Uh, it’s called The Dude.”  He looked at me skeptically.  (Despite the name, the tool was actually quite decent.) Without any format or examples for an assessment, I looked at bandwidth utilization, device security, IOS versions, and a host of other configuration items. ...

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Why I don’t wear Airpods

I have written more than once (here and here, for example) about my belief that technological progression cannot always be considered a good thing.  We are surrounded in the media by a form of technological optimism which I find disconcerting.  “Tech” will solve everything from world hunger to cancer, and the Peter Thiels of the world would have us believe that we can even solve the problem of death.  I don’t see a lot of movies these days, but there used to be a healthy skepticism of technological progress, which was seen as a potential threat to the human...

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