Author: ccie14023

A Passive Star

I was hoping to do a few technical posts but my lab is currently being moved, so I decided to kick off another series of posts I call “NetStalgia”.  The TAC tales continue to be popular, but I only spent two years in TAC and most cases are pretty mundane and not worthy of a blog post.  What about all those other stories I have from various times and places working on networks?  I think there is some value in those stories, not the least because they show where we’ve come from, but also I think there are some universal themes.  So, allow me to take you back to 1995, to a now-defunct company where I first ventured to work on a computer network. I graduated college with a liberal arts degree, and like most liberal arts majors, I ended up working as an administrative assistant.  I was hired on at company that both designed and built museum exhibits.  It was a small company, with around 60 people, half of whom worked as fabricators, building the exhibits, while the other half worked as designers and office personnel.  The fabricators consisted of carpenters, muralists, large and small model builders, and a number of support staff.  The designers were architects, graphic designers, and museum design specialists.  Only the office workers/designers had their own computers, so it was a quite small network...

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Cisco IOS XE Programmability Book

In a previous post I had mentioned I co-authored a book on IOS XE Programmability with some colleagues of mine.  For those who are interested, the book is available here. The book is not a comprehensive how-to, but a summary of the IOS XE features along with a few samples.  It should provide a good overview of the capabilities of IOS XE.  For those who were on my CCIE webinar, it should be more than adequate to get you up to speed on CCIE written programmability topics. As with any technical book, there could be some errata, so please...

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TAC Tales #15: Loopy

I’ve mentioned in previous TAC Tales that I started on a TAC team dedicated to enterprise, which made sense given my background.  Shortly after I came to Cisco the enterprise team was broken up and its staff distributed among the routing protocols team and LAN switch team.  The RP team at that time consisted of service provider experts with little understanding of LAN switching issues, but deep understanding of technologies like BGP and MPLS.  This was back before the Ethernet-everywhere era, and SP experts had never really spent a lot of time with LAN switches. This created a big problem with case routing.  Anyone who has worked more than 5 minutes in TAC knows that when you have a routing protocol problem, usually it’s not the protocol itself but some underlying layer 2 issue.  This is particularly the case when adjacencies are resetting.  The call center would see “OSPF adjacencies resetting” and immediately send the case to the protocols team, when in fact the issue was with STP or perhaps a faulty link.  With all enterprise RP issues suddenly coming into the same queue as SP cases, our SP-centric staff were constantly getting into stuff they didn’t understand. One such case came in to us, priority 1, from a service provider that ran “cell sites”, which are concrete bunkers with radio equipment for cellular transmissions.  “Now wait,” you’re saying,...

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On Being a Dinosaur

An old networking friend whom I mentored for his CCIE a long time ago wrote me an email:  I’ve been a CCIE for 10 years now, he said, and I’m feeling like a dinosaur.  Everyone wants people who know AWS and automation and they don’t want old-school CLI guys. It takes me back to a moment in my career that has always stuck with me.  I was in my early twenties at my first job as a full-time network engineer.  I was working at the San Francisco Chronicle, at the time (early 2000’s) a large newspaper with a wide circulation.  The company had a large newsroom, a huge advertising call center, three printing plants, and numerous circulation offices across the bay area.  We had IP, IPX, AppleTalk and SNA on the network, typical of the multi-protocol environments of the time. My colleague Tony and I were up in the MIS area on the second floor of the old Chronicle building on 5th and Mission St. in downtown San Francisco.  The area we were in contained armies of mainframe programmers, looking at the black screens of COBOL code that were the backbone of the newspaper systems in those days.  Most of the programmers were in their fifties, with gray hair and beards.  Tony and I were young, and TCP/IP networking was new to these guys. I was telling Tony how...

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Cisco Live US 2018

Cisco Live Orlando has wrapped up, at least for me, and I can relax until Cisco Live Europe in January.  I never realized how much work goes into Cisco Live until I became a TME.  Building labs, working on slides, preparing demos, and arranging customer meetings is a months-long process and always a scramble at the end.  It’s a great show, and I can say that having attended as a customer.  It’s more fun and less work to be an attendee, but for technical marketing engineers, it’s still a blast and the highlight of the year. Orlando had a...

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