Author: ccie14023

TAC Tales #17: Escalations

When you open a TAC case, how exactly does the customer support engineer (CSE) figure out how to solve the case?  After all, CSEs are not super-human.  Just like any engineer, in TAC you have a range of brilliant to not-so-brilliant, and everything in between.  Let me give an example:  I worked at HTTS, or high-touch TAC, serving customers who paid a premium for higher levels of support.  When a top engineer at AT&T or Verizon opened a case, how was it that I, who had never worked professionally in a service provider environment, was able to help them at all?  Usually when those guys opened a case, it was something quite complex and not a misconfigured route map! TAC CSEs have an arsenal of tools at their disposal that customers, and even partners, do not.  One of the most powerful is well known to anyone who has ever worked in TAC:  Topic.  Topic is an internal search engine.  It can do more now, but at the time I was in TAC, Topic could search bugs, TAC cases, and internal mailers.  If you had a weird error message or were seeing inexplicable behavior, popping the message or symptoms into Topic frequently resulted in a bug.  Failing that, it might pull up another TAC case, which would show the best troubleshooting steps to take. Topic also searches internal mailers, the...

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CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure

There were quite a few big announcements at Cisco Live this year.  One of the big ones was the overhaul of the certification program.  A number of new certifications were introduced (such as the DevNet CCNA/CCNP), and the existing ones were overhauled.  I wanted to do a post about this because I was involved with the certification program for quite a while on launching these.  I’m posting this on my personal blog, so my thoughts here are, of course, personal and not official. First, the history.  Back when I was at Juniper, I had the opportunity to write questions for the service provider written exams.  It was a great experience, and I got thorough training from the cert program on how to properly write exam questions.  I don’t really remember how I got invited to do it, but it was a good opportunity, as a certified (certifiable?) individual, to give back to the program.  When I came to Cisco, I quickly connected with the cert program here, offering my services as a question writer. I had the training from Juniper, and was an active CCIE working on programmability.  It was a perfect fit, and a nice chance to recertify without taking the test, as writing/reviewing questions gets your CCIE renewed. As I was managing a team within the business unit that was working on Software-Defined Access and programmability, it...

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Cisco Live is over! Long Live Cisco Live!

I think it’s fair to say that all technical marketing engineers are excited for Cisco Live, and happy when it’s over.  Cisco Live is always a lot of fun–I heard one person say “it’s like a family reunion except I like everyone!”  It’s a great chance to see a lot of folks you don’t get to see very often, to discuss technology that you’re passionate about with other like minded people, to see and learn new things, and, for us TMEs, an opportunity to get up in front of a room full of hundreds of people and teach them something.  We all now wait anxiously for our scores, which are used to judge how well we did, and even whether we get invited back. It always amazes me that it comes together at all.  In my last post, I mentioned all the work we do to pull together our sessions.  A lot of my TMEs did not do sessions, instead spending their Cisco Live on their feet at demo booths.  I’m also always amazed that World of Solutions comes together at all.  Here is a shot of what it looked like at 5:30 PM the night before it opened (at 10 AM.)  How the staff managed to clear out the garbage and get the booths together in that time I can’t imagine, but they did. My boss, Carl Solder,...

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Inside Cisco Live

  While I’m thinking about another TAC Tale, I’m quite busy working on slides for Cisco Live.  I figured this makes for another interesting “inside Cisco” post, since most people who have been to the show don’t know much about how it comes together.  A couple years back I asked a customer if I could schedule a meeting with him after Cisco Live, since I was working on slides.  “I thought the Cisco Live people made the slides and you just showed up and presented them!” he said.  Wow, I wish that was the case.  With hundreds of sessions I’m not sure how the CL team could accomplish that, but it would sure be nice for me.  Unfortunately, that’s not the case. If you haven’t been, Cisco Live is a large trade show for network engineers which happens four times globally: in Europe, Australia, the US, and Mexico.  The US event is the largest, but Europe is rather large as well.  Australia and Mexico are smaller but still draw a good crowd.  The Europe and US shows move around.  The last two years Europe was in Barcelona, as it will be next year, but it was in Berlin two years before that.  The US show is in San Diego this year, was in Orlando last year, and was in Las Vegas for two years before that.  Australia is always...

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What are we getting ourselves into?

It seems to be rank heresy for someone working in the valley to say it, but let me say it anyways.  I don’t agree with the axiom of the technology industry which states that all technological progress is always good.  Many in our society instinctively realize this, which is why they oppose genetic engineering and plastics.  Still, the technology industry is so persistently in love with itself, and so optimistic about its potential to solve every human problem, that when anyone points out the consequences of technological progress, we quickly respond with AI’s potential to solve the problems it’s bound to create.  (Sorry for the long sentence, but I’m going to quote Plato in this essay, and by Platonic standards that last sentence is short.)  AI is the solution to everything.  AI will unlock the mysteries of human existence.  AI will allow human beings to live forever.  AI will cure cancer.  AI will solve the dangers of, well, genetic engineering and plastics. An example of this is the extraordinarily concerning essay in the Wall Street Journal a few weeks ago by computer scientist and 60’s icon Jerry Kaplan.  Dr. Kaplan reviews the recent accomplishments of functional brain imaging technologies, which are starting to become more precise in identifying how people are feeling, and even which words they are thinking.  “With improved imaging technology, it may become possible to ‘eavesdrop’ on a person’s...

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